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Posts Tagged ‘CSS’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘CSS’.

Using CSS Grid: Supporting Browsers Without Grid

When using any new CSS, the question of browser support has to be addressed. This is even more of a consideration when new CSS is used for layout as with Flexbox and CSS Grid, rather than things we might consider an enhancement.

Using CSS Grid: Supporting Browsers Without Grid

In this article, I explore approaches to dealing with browser support today. What are the practical things we can do to allow us to use new CSS now and still give a great experience to the browsers that don't support it?

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Naming Things In CSS Grid Layout

When first learning how to use Grid Layout, you might begin by addressing positions on the grid by their line number. This requires that you keep track of where various lines are on the grid, and also be aware of the fact the line numbers reverse if your site is displayed for a right-to-left language.

Naming Things In CSS Grid Layout

Built on top of this system of lines, however, are methods that enable the naming of lines and even grid areas. Using these methods enables easier placement of items by name rather than number, but also brings additional possibilities when creating systems for layout. In this article, I’ll take an in-depth look at the various ways to name lines and areas in CSS Grid Layout, and some of the interesting possibilities this creates.

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CSS Grid Challenge: Winners and Templates

CSS Grid is becoming the new layout standard for the web, and we are all still experimenting with what we can achieve with it. Some folks assume that CSS Grid is just a replacement for table layouts or Flexbox — but that's simply not true. Some also think that they can use CSS Grid to replicate more advanced print layouts, which brings us all closer to what's possible. Obviously print isn't web, but we can experiment with some of the techniques from print on the web, too.

CSS Grid Challenge 2017: The Winners

One of the main reasons behind the idea of the CSS Grid Challenge was to have some starting points for layouts, and show what can be achieved with CSS Grids today. Well, we received some many great submissions that it was really hard to choose the one winner — there are so many submissions who deserve to win first place.

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CSS Grid Gotchas And Stumbling Blocks

In March this year, CSS Grid shipped into production versions of Chrome, Firefox and Safari within weeks of each other. It has been great to see how excited people are about finally being able to use it to solve real problems.

CSS Grid Gotchas And Stumbling Blocks

CSS Grid is such a different way of approaching layout that there are a number of common questions I am asked as people start to use the specification. This article aims to answer some of those, and will be one in a series of articles on Smashing Magazine about layouts.

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How New Font Technologies Will Improve The Web

Words are the primary component of content for the web. However, until a short while ago, all we had at our disposal were but a few system fonts. Adding to that, those system typefaces weren’t necessarily coherent from operating system to operating system (OS).

How New Font Technologies Will Improve The Web

Fortunately, Windows, macOS and Linux made up font-wise, and since then, all modern fonts have been compatible across those OS’. There’s no question, the future of web typography looks promising.

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The CSS Grid Challenge: Build A Template, Win Some Smashing Prizes!

Layout on the web has always been tricky, but with CSS Grid being now supported in all major browsers, most of the hacks that helped to achieve complex layouts have become obsolete. Firefox even has a CSS Grid Inspector built in, so that there’s nothing to hold you back from making even the most challenging flexible layout reality.

The CSS Grid Challenge: Build A Template, Win A Prize!

To explore the possibilities and features of CSS Grid together, we’d love to invite you to a little contest. Because there’s nothing better to completely grasp a new technology as getting your hands dirty and playing with it, right?

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The Nine Principles Of Design Implementation

Recently, I was leading a training session for one of our clients on best practices for implementing designs using HTML and CSS. Part of our time included a discussion of processes such as style-guide-driven development, approaches such as OOCSS and SMACSS, and modular design. Near the end of the last day, someone asked, “But how will we know if we’ve done it right?

The Nine Principles Of Design Implementation

At first, I was confused. I had just spent hours telling them everything they need to “do it right.” But after thinking about it, I realized the question was rooted in a deeper need to guide and evaluate what is often a set of subjective choices — choices that are sometimes made by a lot of different people at different times.

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Progressively Enhancing CSS Layout: From Floats To Flexbox To Grid

Earlier this year, support for CSS grid layout landed in most major desktop browsers. Naturally, the specification is one of the hot topics at meet-ups and conferences. After having some conversations about grid and progressive enhancement, I believe that there’s a good amount of uncertainty about using it. I heard some quite interesting questions and statements, which I want to address in this post.

Progressively enhanced CSS Layout, with Flexbox and CSS Grid.

“When can I start using CSS grid layout?” “Too bad that it’ll take some more years before we can use grid in production.” “Do I need Modernizr in order to make websites with CSS grid layout?” “If I wanted to use grid today, I’d have to build two to three versions of my website.” The CSS grid layout module is one of the most exciting developments since responsive design. We should try to get the best out of it as soon as possible, if it makes sense for us and our projects.

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Building Production-Ready CSS Grid Layouts Today

Industries often experience evolution less as slow and steady progress than as revolutionary shifts in modality that change best practices and methodologies seemingly overnight. This is most definitely true for front-end web development.

Building Production-Ready CSS Grid Layouts Today

Our industry thrives on constant, aggressive development, and new technologies emerge on a regular basis that change the way we do things in fundamental ways.

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Fluid Responsive Typography With CSS Poly Fluid Sizing

Fluid layouts have been a normal part of front-end development for years. The idea of fluid typography, however, is relatively new and has yet to be fully explored. Up until now, most developers' idea of fluid typography is simply using Viewport units maybe with some minimum and maximum sizes.

Fluid Responsive Typography With CSS Poly Fluid Sizing

In this article, we are going to take it to another level. We are going to examine how to create scalable, fluid typography across multiple breakpoints and predefined font sizes using well-supported browser features and some basic algebra. The best part is that you can automate it all by using Sass.

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It’s Time To Start Using CSS Custom Properties

Today, CSS preprocessors are a standard for web development. One of the main advantages of preprocessors is that they enable you to use variables. This helps you to avoid copying and pasting code, and it simplifies development and refactoring.

It's Time To Start Using CSS Custom Properties

We use preprocessors to store colors, font preferences, layout details — mostly everything we use in CSS. But preprocessor variables have some limitations.

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A Comprehensive Guide To HTTP/2 Server Push

The landscape for the performance-minded developer has changed significantly in the last year or so, with the emergence of HTTP/2 being perhaps the most significant of all. No longer is HTTP/2 a feature we pine for. It has arrived, and with it comes server push!

A Guide To HTTP/2 Server Push

Aside from solving common HTTP/1 performance problems (e.g., head of line blocking and uncompressed headers), HTTP/2 also gives us server push! Server push allows you to send site assets to the user before they've even asked for them. It’s an elegant way to achieve the performance benefits of HTTP/1 optimization practices such as inlining, but without the drawbacks that come with that practice.

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